If in Doubt Choose the Car. Why? Benjamin Brodbeck Automativ.de

Most Europeans still feel a strong emotional connection to their car. But why is that the case? In Florence, a group of Italian researchers conducted an experiment investigating the process of decision making by consumers: In most cases, a consumer will choose going by car over using public transport,  even in cases where taking public transport represents a faster, cheaper and more efficient option. The ‘automobile effect’ makes clear why so many people prefer driving a car to more economic alternatives.

The car wins – even though it is expensive

We do not always make rational decisions, especially when it comes to the choice of transportation. Instead of considering all possible options and choosing the most time-saving and economic one, many people prefer to be the driver themselves – even if it is not the most efficient option.

Scientists studied a group of participants who were engaging in a game about modes of transportation. In this game, participants were given the choice between going by car or taking the metro. Each player started off with a certain budget and taking into account expenses and travelling time, had to select their preferred mode of transportation. Mirroring real life conditions, the price for the metro tickets was fixed whereas the costs for using the car varied depending on the weather, accidents, construction work on the roads and other events. In addition, the costs for using the car were dependent on the ‘traffic’, that is on the number of other players going by car.

In the best-case scenario of the experiment travelling by car was cheaper than travelling by metro because it was the quickest option. However, when the traffic reached its peak, taking the metro was clearly the cheaper option. In total, 50 rounds were played and after each round, the players received feedback on their performance and were asked to decide again on a preferred mode of transportation. As the game went on, the researchers expected the participants to learn from their mistakes and make more informed decisions – especially since an improved performance resulted in a financial profit. After the first series of the experiment, the researchers changed the option ‘metro’ to ‘bus’. Nevertheless, the percentage of participants choosing automobile over public transportation continued to be 55% or even higher. The participants showed a clear preference for the automobile, even when the cost of going by car was about 50% higher than that for the metro. Changing the option ‘metro’ to ‘bus’ brought about similar results.

It seems that people are highly biased when it comes to selecting a mode of transport and our decision appears to be based on rather simple rules.

The choice of transport is often guided by our emotions

Taking into consideration the fact that it was only a game and people only had to make ‘theoretical choices’ and they didn’t actually have to get into a car or metro, the results are even more impressive. Even in a purely theoretical context, the participants could not renounce their penchant for cars.

It looks like rational decision making is abandoned when it comes to driving a car – or at least, this seems to be the case for the majority of the people.

Of course, this game is not a solid representation of all aspects of real life decision making, but it does highlight our continued passion for automobiles. Perhaps ultimately, the satisfaction you get from being in full control of your own mobility is what drives your choice.

Can you relate to these results and would you also choose to go to work by car than use the bus or metro?

 


Benjamin Brodbeck Publicist Automativ Guest Blogger BARE InternationalAuthor: Benjamin Brodbeck @automativ

Benjamin Brodbeck, 24 years old, is a multifaceted petrolhead. Besides his work as a jazz pianist, he brings his passion and knowledge about cars as a publicist at AUTOmativ.de. He studied Automotive Business Management and is currently doing his master’s degree in journalism at the University of Vienna.


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Jamesdean

The 30th of September of 1955 James Dean died in a car accident. The “Little Bastard” numbered 130 played its part. It was a Porsche 550 Spyder, one of just ninety produced, a silver bullet,  shiny, fast and rare. After the crash the car was broken up for parts, but today the remaining parts are nowhere to be found.

The 24 years old movie star acquired the Porsche 550 Spyder during the shooting of Rebel Without a Cause, to use it in a race in Salinas, San Francisco. Dean hired the legendary car customizer George Barris to work on the car. The racing number 130 was painted on the front, sides and back. Along with red racing stripes and the name Little Bastard on the back.

The Little Bastard was supposed to be trailered to Salinas that day but at the last minute, Dean decided to drive himself and took the mechanic with him. At 5:59PM a 1950 Ford Custom Tudor Coupe, traveling in the opposite direction collided with the Spyder. James Dean died and his copilot,  the mechanic Rolf Wütherich, was badly injured.

This was the beginning of the Little Bastard disasters. George Barris purchased what remained of the Porsche, selling off the engine to Troy Mchenry and the chassis to William Eschrid. When the wreck arrived at Barris’ garage, the Porsche slipped and fell on one of the mechanics unloading it. The accident broke both of the mechanic’s legs.

And the show goes on. During a race at the Pomona Fair Grounds in 1956, Troy McHenry and William Eschrid both racing cars with parts of the Little Bastard suffered accidents. McHenry died when his car, which had the Porsche’s engine installed, went out of control and hit a tree. Eschrid’s car flipped over. Eschrid, who survived despite serious injuries, later said that the car suddenly locked up when he went into a curve.

The car’s evil influence continued after the race. One kid trying to steal the Porsche’s steering wheel slipped and gashed his arm. Barris reluctantly sold two of the car’s tires to a young man; within a week, the man was nearly involved in a wreck when the two tires blew out simultaneously.

While being stored in a garage in Fresno California the garage caught on fire and everything but the Spyder was destroyed. In fact the paint was barely even scorched. When the car was put on exhibit in Sacramento, it fell from its display and broke a teenager’s hip. George Barkuis, who was hauling the Spyder on a flatbed truck, was killed instantly when the Porsche fell on him after he was thrown from his truck in an accident.

The strange deadly events surrounding the car continued until 1960.  That year the Porsche was  loaded onto a box car in Miami, Florida  safety exhibit and sealed shut. Then it was transported via train back to California. When the train arrived in Los Angeles, the seal was still intact, yet the car had mysteriously  vanished. To this day, the Little Bastard’s whereabouts is unknown.  

So it seems that it is not just in horror stories that cars are possessed!


Author: Vicky Lima  

Vicky Lima is a multifaceted professional with a Master Degree in Advertising. She is passionate about customer experience and the Automotive world. Besides her work in social media, she shares her passion and knowledge about cars as a writer. An avid traveler around the world investigating the relationship between customers and brands. 


Interested in becoming an Automotive Evaluator with BARE International?

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Want to be a guest blogger for BARE’s Automotive community We Are Cars?

Apply to: wearecars@bareinternational.com

 

Porsche 911 RSR (77), Dempsey Proton Racing: Patrick Dempsey, Patrick Long, Marco Seefried

There are currently about 500 official motorsport circuits and several hundred international race series worldwide. While some struggle for their financial existence, many circuits and series still have a great number of spectators and an extensive media coverage. The question here is, what is the impact on car brands and their relationship with the customers?

Technology developments

Are you one of those people who are enthusiastic about motorsports? If yes, you are part of a large community. Despite the climate and environmental debate around cars over the past years – the love for motor sports stays true. This is very much to the satisfaction of both operators, participants and spectators.

This acceptance and enthusiasm of the general public is the result of a decades long  commitment between car makers and motorsport committees who ambitiously revise and tweak motorsports’ rules with the objective of advancing technology. In this way they create a sustainable and credible external image which is also continually adjusted to be up-to-date and trend setting.

Some technologies developed for motorsports have found their way into our own vehicles. For example, the dual clutch transmission was applied in motorsports by Porsche in the eighties. In the same way, the high-performance capacitor based hybrid technology was first developed for motorsports more recently.

When motorsports becomes marketing

There is also a question whether the investment of participating in these races pays out. The sports car manufacturers usually participate for two main reasons: testing and exposure. There is nowhere else that can they recreate the extreme conditions and extreme load that is found in endurance races. Sports performance is one of the key elements of a sports car manufacturers external image and very much required for customer satisfaction.

Similarly, car manufacturers ask themselves how a successful image can be built in a way that can be used for marketing campaigns that are meaningful and credible to their customers. In sports – especially in motorsports – the problem is that on one hand while second-placed competitors are spurned as just an also-ran in the media, victories can also be quickly forgotten.

Long-term participation and recurring wins

It is really only through a successful long-term commitment to motorsports that a sports car manufacturer can establish a worldwide brand and continually reinforce its image as a car maker.

Let’s take Porsche again as an example: by splitting their engagement to different race series (rally, endurance racing, several DTM racing classes and Formula 1) and their continuous successes, Porsche advances to all essential areas and has created a strong brand. This way Porsche is able to acquire new customers buying Porsche cars.

This makes it difficult for manufacturers who only make a short term commitment to leverage this into a customer demand for their products. It is also hard to build customer satisfaction thanks to their meeting the aspirations they have created with their sports activity.

Is the presence and the success of an automaker in motorsports series (DTM, Formula 1, …) important for you?

 

*Article image: Porsche 911 RSR (77), Dempsey Proton Racing: Patrick Dempsey, Patrick Long, Marco Seefried

 


Benjamin Brodbeck Publicist Automativ Guest Blogger BARE InternationalAuthor: Benjamin Brodbeck @automativ

Benjamin Brodbeck, 24 years old, is a multifaceted petrolhead. Besides his work as a jazz pianist, he brings his passion and knowledge about cars as a publicist at AUTOmativ.de. He studied Automotive Business Management and is currently doing his master’s degree in journalism at the University of Vienna.


Interested in becoming an Automotive Evaluator with BARE International?

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Want to be a guest blogger for BARE’s Automotive community We Are Cars?

Apply to: wearecars@bareinternational.com

Autosalon auf der Techno Classica Essen 2015

It’s rare that a car will sell itself; though it may be possible for super cars, which are emotionally charged and sold to powerful wealthy customers who don’t need to be persuaded. But wait, even then is it actually true? In this case appearances can be deceptive and we jump to our own conclusions.

The manufacturers of these highly attractive cars use psychological methods for sales which are being communicated to the public and to the individual customer by the marketing department and the sales staff.

One of these principles or methods is the impression of rarity, products typically get more popular if there aren’t many of them. Consequently, the demand raises the price. Then there is the sympathetic salesman, sympathy is another method of sales psychology. It’s easily understood how to apply and implement this method, even though it cannot be universally applied.

It’s extremely rare, buy it now…

The perception of rarity applies to super sports cars and parts of the used-car market but for the volume market other sales strategies are in use. For instance, car manufacturers try to influence people in the social circles of a potential customer and convince them to buy a car so that – in a kind of chain reaction – the potential customer, affected by peer pressure, will also make a purchase.

As a result a potential customer may find themselves coming home with a personally signed purchase contract three days after they went to a car dealer to take a look. Superficially this appears to be a purchase made for inexplicable reasons.

Sympathy: incorporated at the dealer

Even minor changes to an overall product or service can have profound consequences on the degree of customer loyalty to that product or to the quality claims of the product. Scientific studies have shown that product packages with pictures of faces are more popular if their pupils are larger. Pupil dilation is said to be an indicator for sympathy. So what could be changed in car dealerships? Set up billboards or posters showing attractive faces? Why not!

In this way small, insignificant changes on a product or on the product package will have a stronger impact on the customer’s perception than the customer may admit to or even realise. The customer’s subconscious mind draws conclusions on the properties of a product, even though the product appears not to have changed at all.

In a similar case in a different industry, many people were suddenly complaining about the quality of a brandy after the top capsule was changed from lead to plastic. To investigate and verify this theory the company sold half of their product with lead capsules and the other half with plastic. Indeed the result showed that customers perceived a change in the quality of the brandy depending on the product package.

There are many situations which correlate with this so-called Irradiation Phenomenon when buying a car. For example the perception of a cars acceleration depending on the return spring in the gas pedal or the clothes of a salesman defining their position in the company and the sympathy that the customer will get. Understanding these factors and how they can be used to improve customer satisfaction and push towards the elusive perfect sale will be keys for future success.

How do you feel when you are at your local car dealer looking to buy a new car? Are these things that you’d pay attention to in your conversation with the sales person?


Benjamin Brodbeck Publicist Automativ Guest Blogger BARE InternationalAuthor: Benjamin Brodbeck @automativ

Benjamin Brodbeck, 24 years old, is a multifaceted petrolhead. Besides his work as a jazz pianist, he brings his passion and knowledge about cars as a publicist at AUTOmativ.de. He studied Automotive Business Management and is currently doing his master’s degree in journalism at the University of Vienna.


Interested in becoming an Automotive Evaluator with BARE International?

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Want to be a guest blogger for BARE’s Automotive community We Are Cars?

Apply to: wearecars@bareinternational.com

Benjamin Brodbeck AUTOmativ Publicist 2

Benjamin recently joined BARE as an Automotive Evaluator. He has a true dedication to learn and share everything he knows about the automotive industry, partly inspired by a father who works for an iconic car brand. We couldn’t resist catching up with him for an interview to learn more.

Hi Benjamin, tell us a bit about yourself

My name is Benjamin Brodbeck, I’m 24 years old and I have a degree in the field of automotive industry. Music has a great significance in my life – especially Jazz music. I play the piano and perform with the Jazz trio BBQJazz from Stuttgart. I enjoy leaving my well-structured day behind me and finish it with improvised and self-written songs.

Besides my studies and music, I express my passion for cars by writing as a freelancer and in photography. Right now I am committed to building the online-magazine AUTOmativ.de.

For the past 40 years my father has worked at Porsche. During my childhood he led the department which created exclusive equipment and design options and limited edition cars. I was raised in an environment of well-designed sports cars and – thanks to my father – have always been in touch with different people who were working in very varied positions in the car industry.

How do you see the evolution of the Automotive industry?

At the university, questions like that filled up whole papers. But in short – I think we have a significant trend towards an immense diversity and individualization of cars. This trend will intensify together with the trend of delivering unique customer experiences at car dealerships and at different events to create a strong customer loyalty.

Customers subconsciously connect a car brand with the testimonies, statements and behaviour of the employees. If the advice and the service they get is not satisfying, this will have an impact on the image – even though it may has just been one person.

So the quality of service at dealerships impact the brand?

Every single car dealership has a great impact on the company’s image – they are the front line. First there are certain standards that a car dealership has to comply with; second, there are individual philosophies that should match with the company’s identity.

Car brands that do not ensure their car dealerships comply with their standards (in comparison to competitors) by inspecting them, preferably using a third party, are in danger of losing contact with the foundation of their company – the customers.

After getting my degree I spent a lot of time looking at  customer satisfaction and the behaviour of car salespeople at car dealerships – but was never able to do such an evaluation myself. I was very curious about the questions and the focus of the first evaluation that BARE International sent me.

The evaluations went well and were very interesting: You always have your checklist in mind and compare the salesman’s behaviour and the characteristics of the dealership with your checklist and tick them off.

Was the experience as an Evaluator a benefit for you personally?

Besides getting to know very different cars on various test drives, you also have the possibility to identify different strategies of the salespeople and – at least partly – use them yourself later on.  On top of all the required formalities, every salesperson has room for manoeuvre in which they have to persuade with affability and courtesy. Every good salesperson is an artist, who relies on their strategy and improves with every new customer that they serve. To observe this behaviour is fun and can help in your own everyday life.

What recommendation would you give to the car industry?

As I said, using the tool of mystery shopping and evaluation, companies can gain knowledge about problems. This can lead to relevant actions to ensure compliance with guidelines, detect weaknesses and reveal further potential improvements.

The results shape the foundation of benchmarking between competitors and thereby constitutes an important part of the requirements for a successful customer relations.

One thing is for sure: far too few customers complain when the service isn’t pleasing. Most of them just stop coming. Therefore it is even more important – and in the company’s own interest – to conduct mystery shopping.

Stay tuned for more to come from Benjamin Brodbeck, guest blogger for We Are Cars.

 


 

Interested in becoming an Automotive Evaluator with BARE International?

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cascoProducts are no longer what they once were. Co-branding isn’t the newest hit in town; but nowadays it appears to be all around.

The concept of co-branding hit the roof in the autumn of 2004 when Karl Lagerfeld designed a  one-off collection for H&M and made his exclusive designs available for the crowd. Soon thereafter, many other collaborations followed within the fashion industry such as Stella McCartney for Adidas or Katie Grand for Hogan.

This new way of collaborating across brands entered a whole new level when we started to see trans-market conjunctions. Fashion brands got influenced by other industries such as sports, food and drinks or entertainment.

We saw David Beckham rolling out his underwear with H&M while Karl Lagerfeld jumped into the soda industry with Coca Cola. In the more  premium bubbles industry we saw Swarovski shining together with Möet & Chandon while Pucci mingled with Veuve Cliquot.

In the mobile manufacturing industry, Dolce & Gabbana took a stand with Motorola and Versace for Nokia.

How about the automotive industry? Karl Lagerfeld kicked off a new mainstream collaboration across fashion brands in 2004. But if we take a look back to the 20th century,  already in the 1970s, Gucci partnered up with defunct automaker AMC (American Motors Corporation). Armani designed a CLK limited edition for Mercedes-Benz in 2003. And Porsche partnered up with Adidas creating both a shoes and clothing line for the brand while Ferrari focused on sneakers for PUMA. Martini pimped a Porsche 918 racing car and Fendi composed the GranCabrio for Maserati.

What is the tactical objective behind these collaborations, and what implication do they have for the individual brands? Co-branding indicates the departure of brands from the core single-brand strategy. Maybe not always for a pure commercial gain but rather for the sake of branding, product placement and reputation management. However, always and perpetually driven by one single force: the customers’ hunger for uniqueness.

What to watch out for? Improvident co-branding might generate adverse effects on brand image and brand loyalty. Therefore, co-branders better think strategically, with a win-win situation for both parties in mind and never neglect reputation management. These kind of partnerships better be controlled by limited editioning, clear synchronism between the brands and consistent communication. The targeted customers must understand the brands and the connection. If not, the brand equity might not have the increase expected.

So, when to expect my new boxer shorts by… Lamborghini?


 

Gilles Devos

Guest author: Gilles Devos @gillesdevos 

Gilles is a passionate Epicurean,
with experience in hospitality, sales & marketing.

He likes to devour new trends and explore creative ventures which enables him to live up to his motto: “Don’t follow the trends, create them.”

 

 


We Are Cars is the community for a new generation of customer experience in the automotive industry. We Are Cars keep serving the latest news related to classic- and supercars, bringing awareness to car manufacturers’ transformation to a customer satisfaction and experience industry.

We Are Cars is Powered by BARE International, a global leader in customer experience with solid experience in the Automotive industry. Their customized Automotive services have proven track records of delivering performance, improving results for even the most savvy and demanding industry leaders.

BARE International offer paid missions for Evaluators who want to contribute to better customer experiences. Automotive Programmes include visits at dealerships and test-drive.  The Evaluator checks the service provided and gives feedback to BARE International.

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Join Joseph Klibansky as he gets ready for The Challenge 2015. Learn about the man behind the artist, how he got to paint on one of the sexiest canvases ever, a Porsche 911, and which car he will turn into pure art as he takes to the wheels himself.

Joseph Klibansky is one of the top young contemporary artists of today. He is about to enter his first “The Challenge – a private rally”. A supercar tour that kicks off on August 31 in Berlin and will take him through 10 different cities and cover thousands of kilometres. Get to know the man behind the artist and how he came to design a Porsche for the Gumball 3000, as we get ready for the live coverage of Klibansky’s Roadtrip.

Klibansky’s own race towards stardom started with a blast. A business graduate, he found his passion for art in the digital sphere when he was 23, and now, at just 31, is widely appreciated by collectors around the world for his dynamic paintings and sculptures. “When I do something I want to do it fast because I feel a strong urge to communicate,” explained Klibansky.

A rebel with a team

Klibansky received a lot of support from the art world which allowed him to re-invest his earnings and grow to a team of 17 people today. “It’s about believing in yourself and reinvesting. You are never self-made, you always need a great team that trust your vision,” said Klibansky.

A rebel at heart and with the sixth gear in place, he didn’t stop to study Fine Art. He knew what he wanted to do and went for it. Klibansky brings positive energy in every piece he makes, “Aesthetics are important. Everything I create has to have an attractive energy that lures the viewer in,” explained Klibansky.

Painting the sexiest canvases on earth

Little did he know that one day, his canvas would be a Porsche. “I got an offer I couldn’t resist, to combine my art with a piece of automotive excellence.

“You might have spotted the Porsche 911 Turbo in the Gumball 3000 Stockholm – Las Vegas. It took me about 1,5 months to finish it but turned out to be one of the most photographed cars in the rally. Can you imagine a more amazing canvas than that?,” Klibansky continued.

Everything is just more exciting when you drive a supercar

His passion for motorised vehicles started as a kid, when at the age of 12 he got his first cross bike. “I’ve always been a petrolhead. When I’m driving I feel free and creative and my mind is at its most productive.

“You wake up like a kid at Christmas. There’s an excitement in the air. You start the engine, the sound, the acceleration. How people perceive you and turn their heads as you come driving through the streets. There’s an attraction. Everything is just more exciting when you drive a supercar,” enthused Klibansky.

This year for The Challenge rally, Joseph Klibansky is ready to take it to the next level, his imagination has no limits and he will design another exclusive new Art-Car. This time using five of his artworks. Which car will get the lucky draw this time around when Klibansky takes to the wheels himself? What would you chose? Check out the Klibansky ArtCar Reveal for yourself.

Follow Klibansky as he gets ready for The Challenge. Exclusive insights brought to you by We Are Cars, Powered by Bare International.

#wearecars #klibansky #klibanskyartcar

 

Klibansky-Art-Car3 Klibansky-Art-Car2


 

For editors

Klibansky
Joseph Klibansky makes large-scale, idealistic digital paintings that are built up through hundreds of layers of photography enriched with acrylic paint on archival cotton paper overlaid with a liquid resin. His work conveys a layering and compression of time, space and place creating new narratives by creating dreamy images of cities, combining past and future.

A Dutch artist at 31 with worldwide fame, he broke a record at the age of 28 when he sold a work for €40000. That’s an international record for such a young artist.
www.josephklibansky.com

We Are Cars and BARE International
We Are Cars is the community for a new generation of customer experience in the automotive industry. We Are Cars keep serving the latest news related to classic- and supercars, bringing awareness to car manufacturers’ transformation to a customer satisfaction and experience industry.

We Are Cars is Powered by BARE International, a global leader in customer experience with solid experience in the Automotive industry. Their customized Automotive services have proven track records of delivering performance, improving results for even the most savvy and demanding industry leaders.
www.bareinternational.com

The Challenge 2015
The Rally kicks off in Berlin 31 August and ends in Athens. The supercars will really through 10 different cities and more than 4000 kilometres. The participants and their supercars won’t know until the day of departure where they should be heading to next. Each day a different city.
The Challenge 2015 on Facebook

 

shutterstock_120937963

I was recently reading a blog post on LinkedIn by Carlos Ghosn, the CEO of the Renault-Nissan Alliance on the way that electric vehicles are now becoming mainstream. While the main focus was on the technical achievement and the sales, there were two things that particularly drew my attention.

The first was that customer satisfaction for owners of the electric vehicles is among the highest of all their vehicles. This is noteworthy because the industry has always had a concern that electric vehicles would not meet customer’s expectations, and consequently leave the customer dissatisfied. I believe that Nissan have consistently been honest and forthcoming about their electric cars, truthfully stating the expected range, and working hard to improve the infrastructure. As a consequence, they have been able to meet the realistic expectations the customer has developed.

That being said, the government incentives and the efforts of municipal governments to put charging stations in place haven’t hurt, but kudos to the manufacturer for believing that would happen in parallel with their sales drive.

Secondly, was the fact that the blog post focussed on one individual customer, Yves Nivelle, who had bought the 250000th vehicle, and made the story about him. In fact, not only the story, but also an accompanying video. A company who isn’t afraid to talk about their customers and even talk to their customers in public is a company that is serious about their commitment to customer satisfaction.

It looks to me that Nissan understand the relationship between customer service and customer satisfaction and are committed to ensure that both grow together.


collin

Guest author: Colin Hensley @colingoeu

Colin has wide experience in managing and building brand and organisational reputations including more than 15 years in the automotive industry. He has had responsibility for communications and public affairs spanning public and private institutions across three continents.

 

 

Evaluator Mystery Shopping at Bare International

Sei appassionato di auto e vuoi fare la differenza? Abbiamo il lavoro che fa per te! Aiutiamo le migliori case automobilistiche nella ricerca della miglior servizio clienti presso le loro concessionarie. Abbiamo bisogno di persone come te per fare le visite, fare delle prove su strada e dare un feedback. Tutte le missioni sono pagate.

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Qui alcune domande che ti potresti fare in questo momento:

  1. Come funziona una visita?

Si comporti come un cliente interessato all’acquisto di una automobile per fare un test-drive.

    1. a sua scelta la concessionaria e la data per fare la visita.
    2. legga le linee guida per preparare la visita.
    3. completi il questionario dopo la visita.
  1. Quante visite posso fare?

Può fare tutte le visite che desidera ma solo una nella stessa concessionaria. Non possiamo rischiare che i venditori la riconoscano.

  1. Posso lavorare con marchi differenti? Can I work with different brands?

Si, stiamo lavoriamo con diverse case automobilistiche durante l’arco dell’anno.Bare International Automotive Industry

  1. Posso scegliere il modello da guidare?

Si, quando parla con un coordinatore questo la aiuterà a fare in modo che i suoi desideri diventino realtà. Riceverà più dettagli una volta fatta l’application sul job-board.

  1. Quanto vengo pagato?

La remunerazione dipende dai singoli progetti. A volte anche 200 €. Può guardare le opportunità di lavoro nella sua regione su questa mappa.

  1. Quali sono le condizioni?

Si tratta di un lavoro con un contratto freelance. Giorni flessibili da scegliere e compativili con il vostro lavoro. I dettagli sono specificati nel contratto di lavoro che dovrà visionare prima di completare la registrazione.

  1. Cosa succede quando mi registro?

Vada sul nostro job-board e scelga classic job board, trovi la soluzione che meglio le conviene. Oppure dia un’occhiata alle opzioni nella mappa qui sotto.

  1. Avrò un contatto di riferimento?

Si, il suo coordinatore la contatterà appena dopo la registrazione, in modo da aiutarla nel processo.

Pronto a prendere parte al progetto? Qui il primo passo  Registrati qui  e ci metteremo in contatto appena dopo per aiutarla a partire con la prima missione.

 

 

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Porsche-

What do customers want?

A super car on the inside or a shiny, impressive one? Once you have chosen your car, are you fully satisfied with it? And does it really matter if it’s a Porsche or a Hyundai?
J.D. Power recently performed their annual Automotive Performance, Execution and Layout (APEAL) study, to measure owner satisfaction with the performance and design of their new vehicles. What do they like or dislike about their new car after 90 days?

84,000 owners were surveyed between February and May 2015. On a scale of 1000 points, 77 attributes, divided in 8 categories of vehicle and design, were evaluated. Engine/transmission; ride, handling and braking; comfort/convenience; seats; cockpit/instrument panel; heating, ventilation and cooling; sound system; and styling/exterior.

Some interesting facts come out of this year’s edition. The gap between luxury and non luxury cars has decreased to its lowest point since 2006. Even though premium brands consistently have the best design and ride with 841 points registered this year, non premium brands are getting closer to the upper scale scoring up to 790 points this year. This is definitely related to the incorporation of more safety features and technology in the vehicles.

“Over the past several years, we have seen non-premium brands increasingly offer the types of in-vehicle technologies that used to be available only to premium buyers,” said Renee Stephens, Vice President of U.S. automotive Quality at J.D. Power.

Who was the overall winner?

For 11 years in a row, Porsche ranks highest with 874 points. Followed by Jaguar with 855,  BMW with 854 points, Mercedes-Benz with 853 points and Audi with 852 points.

The automotive market of today is nothing if not impressive and diverse. Having owner insights is vital for car manufacturers to meet the demands of the market. The knowledge of how owners actually experience the car. What is their level of satisfaction? This is the key question every car manufacturer should ask themselves. Just design or just technical capabilities are not enough, it has to be the perfect combination.

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Author: Vicky Lima  

Vicky Lima is a multifaceted professional with a Master Degree in Advertising. She is passionate about customer experience and the Automotive world. Besides her work in social media, she shares her passion and knowledge about cars as a writer. An avid traveler around the world investigating the relationship between customers and brands. 


Interested in becoming an Automotive Evaluator with BARE International?

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Want to be a guest blogger for BARE’s Automotive community We Are Cars?

Apply to: wearecars@bareinternational.com